The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

A forum to discuss the Urantia Book.
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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Sandy »

Wow! :shock: The Vatican holding a press conference on UFOs ...that's big.
My first thoughts were just like the article's..."What do they know that we don't." :roll
xxSandy
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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:sunflower: Impressive, well-stated response, considering the question did not suggest the Bible was inferior.

Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: If the Urantia Book is modern epochal revelation, how does this reflect on the Bible?

"The Urantia Book presents itself as a modern revelation that expands upon and clarifies the teachings found in the Bible, while maintaining reverence for the Bible as a preceding revelation. Here are some key points on how The Urantia Book relates to the Bible:

It affirms the Bible contains inspired truths and upholds Jesus' life and teachings as the fourth epochal revelation to humanity, as recorded in the New Testament. However, it states the Bible is a partial revelation limited by the circumstances and comprehension levels of its human authors. The Urantia Book claims to provide a broader cosmological context and clarification of spiritual truths.

It retells and expands upon many Biblical stories and events, such as the lives of Adam and Eve, the Lucifer rebellion, and Jesus' life, filling in gaps and adding details not found in the Bible. While echoing some Bible passages, it diverges on certain doctrinal matters like the nature of God, the circumstances of Jesus' birth and death, and the concept of original sin.

Rather than contradicting or replacing the Bible outright, The Urantia Book presents itself as the 'fifth epochal revelation' to supplement and build upon the truth in earlier revelations like the Bible.

In essence, The Urantia Book upholds the Bible as an inspired sacred text containing truth, but views itself as a continuation of divine revelation that expands, elucidates and 'upsteps' the spiritual truths first introduced in the Bible for modern comprehension."


:scratch: Testing Perplexity's knowledge of Jesus' divinity ...

Q: After Jesus' resurrection, what was most influential in creating belief in his divinity?


"According to the sources provided, the resurrection of Jesus itself was the most influential factor that led his disciples and early followers to believe in his divinity. Here are the key points:

Prior to the resurrection, the disciples believed Jesus was the Messiah, but likely understood that to mean he would become an earthly king of the Jews. His crucifixion seemed to contradict that belief.

However, when the disciples encountered the risen Jesus after his death, it radically transformed their understanding of who he was. They came to believe he was not just the human Messiah, but the divine Son of God who had been exalted to heaven.

The resurrection proved to them that Jesus had conquered death and was not just a human teacher, but a cosmic divine figure with power over life and death itself. This led to the beginning of Trinitarian beliefs about Jesus' divinity.

The resurrection served as undeniable proof to the disciples that Jesus was the Son of God, validating his claims and showing God's favor upon him in an unexpected way. It instilled in the disciples an unwavering conviction about Jesus' divinity, transforming them from fearful individuals to bold proclaimers of the Gospel message about Jesus being God's Son.

So in summary, while Jesus made claims about his identity during his life, it was the stunning event of his bodily resurrection that provided the definitive proof and catalyst for his followers to recognize and embrace his divine status as the Son of God."


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Sandy »

Yes, that is an impressive answer! I could have used that years ago when explaining the Urantia book to my parents.
xxSandy
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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:bana: Re: "A History of the Jews" by Paul Johnson, 1987, pp.124-32 and 144-5

Very good explanation why Jesus' divinity was not accepted by Judaism!
(but Perplexity doesn't say much about this information) :roll:


:study: About the first revelation of Jesus' divinity ...

"... the greatest of all the revelations of his divinity, his resurrection ..." (UB, 182:3.5)

"He became a part of the personal experience of almost one thousand human beings before he finally took leave of Urantia." (182:2.9)

"Only one thing we are certain of, that is, when he does return, all the world will likely know about it, for he must come
as the supreme ruler of a universe and not as the obscure babe of Bethlehem." (176:4.5)

176:4.5 suggests that Jesus' ceremonial return will be delayed until most of the world knows of his divinity,
even as the once incarnated Son of God. If UB dissemination does not help promote this awareness, then what will :?:


:study: Perplexity's viewpoint of Jesus' divinity ...

Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: Who was the first human being to wholeheartedly believe in Jesus' divinity?

'The New Testament itself provides evidence that some of Jesus' earliest followers wholeheartedly believed in his divinity:

In John 20:28, Thomas declares to Jesus 'My Lord and my God!' after seeing his risen body. In Philippians 2:6, Paul states that Jesus 'being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be grasped.'

This affirms Jesus' divine nature.

The Gospel of John repeatedly has Jesus claiming divine titles and prerogatives, such as 'I am the bread of life' (6:35), 'I am the light of the world' (8:12), and the famous 'I am' statements linking him to the divine name revealed to Moses (8:58).

However, it's difficult to pinpoint exactly who was the very first individual to believe in Jesus' divinity. The earliest Christians seemed to affirm both Jesus' humanity and divinity from the start, though their understanding deepened over time. The writings of the Apostolic Fathers in the late 1st/early 2nd century show an established belief in Christ's divinity:

Ignatius of Antioch repeatedly calls Jesus 'God' (e.g. To the Ephesians 7:2, 18:2). The Epistle of Barnabas refers to Jesus as 'the Son of God' and speaks of his pre-existence (5:5, 12:10).

So while the New Testament points to the earliest disciples like Peter, John, and Thomas as having this belief, the precise first individual is unclear. But the divinity of Christ was a core tenet of Christianity from its inception.' "

Q: What does the Urantia Book say about Simon Peter's belief in Jesus' divinity?

"The Urantia Book portrays Simon Peter as one of the first apostles to wholeheartedly believe in Jesus' divinity: In the account of Jesus' life, it states that after Peter's confession that Jesus is the Deliverer (the Christ), Jesus explains to the apostles that he is indeed the Son of God. This marks a turning point where the apostles, especially Peter, began to fully grasp Jesus' divine nature.

Later, after Jesus' resurrection, the book describes Peter's firm conviction of Jesus' divinity: 'Peter took the lead at the termination of the forty days of waiting and telegraphic watchcare. It was a difficult job for him to persuade his fellow apostles to quit talking so much about Jesus' advice concerning the forthcoming bestowal of the new teacher, and to begin their work of finding out what to believe and do directly themselves.'

The book portrays Peter as the first to fully embrace that Jesus was the incarnated Creator Son of their universe, and to dedicate himself to spreading that realization and Jesus' teachings. So while the earliest followers like John the Baptist and Nathaniel may have glimpsed Jesus' divinity, the Urantia Book depicts Simon Peter as the first to wholeheartedly and publicly profess belief that Jesus was the divine Son of God incarnate."


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:study: I was hoping for more commentary on Parts I-III, but this response
hints that Part IV is the more significant part of this revelation! :o

Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: Part IV of the Urantia Book ("The Life and Teachings of Jesus") is so different from Parts I-III !
What makes Part IV an important part of this book?


"Part IV of The Urantia Book, titled 'The Life and Teachings of Jesus,' stands out as a significant and unique part of the book for several reasons:

It provides an incredibly detailed and vivid narrative account of Jesus' entire life, from his birth to death and resurrection. This extensive biography fills in many gaps and expands greatly upon the limited accounts found in the New Testament gospels, offering new insights into Jesus' childhood, adolescence, family life, travels, relationships, teachings, and inner life.

While Parts I-III are written in a more expository and instructional style, Part IV is a rich narrative with well-developed characters, subplots, realistic dialogue, and high attention to detail. This makes it read more like historical fiction or a novel, allowing readers to vividly experience the life of Jesus as if they were there.

The narrative in Part IV portrays Jesus as an amazingly balanced, sincere, kind, reasonable, and relatable human personality in addition to his divinity. It provides an intimate look at his incomparable character traits and how he related to family, friends, followers, and even enemies.

Part IV aims to reveal the true teachings and spiritual significance of Jesus' life in a way that transcends doctrinal interpretations. It presents Jesus' life as the greatest possible revelation of the loving nature of God and the spiritual potential of human beings.

The extensive details about Jesus' life in Part IV are said to come from spiritual witnesses who carefully chronicled and preserved an accurate record of his bestowal mission on Earth. This gives Part IV a sense of authenticity and authority not found in other accounts.

In summary, the biographical narrative style, vivid human portrayal of Jesus, expanded life details, and purported spiritual origin make Part IV a unique, compelling, and highly important part of The Urantia Book's revelation."


:idea: That Perplexity identifies the important "one thing" about Jesus' bestowal mission teases that Perplexity is guided by the Spirit of Truth!
Of course, not directly through machine intelligence but perhaps through the minds of Perplexity's developers:

Perplexity: "It presents Jesus' life as the greatest possible revelation of the loving nature of God and the spiritual potential of human beings."

"Throughout your Urantia bestowal you need be concerned with but one thing, the unbroken communion between you and your Paradise Father; and it will be by the perfection of such a relationship that the world of your bestowal, even all the universe of your creation, will behold a new and more understandable revelation of your Father and my Father, the Universal Father of all." (120:1.4)

"Your great mission to be realized and experienced in the mortal incarnation is embraced in your decision to live a life wholeheartedly motivated to do the will of your Paradise Father, thus to reveal God, your Father, in the flesh and especially to the creatures of the flesh." (120:2.8 )


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:sunflower: Location of the second Garden of Eden (started about 38,038 years ago;
first Garden about 37,938 years ago, now submerged Syrian peninsula)

"This site was known to Adam as one of the three original selections of the committee assigned to choose possible locations
for the Garden proposed by Van and Amadon. The two rivers themselves were a good natural defense in those days, and
a short way north of the second garden the Euphrates and Tigris came close together so that a defense wall extending
fifty-six miles could be built for the protection of the territory to the south and between the rivers." (76:1.3)

See also: https://www.britannica.com/place/Tigris ... ver-system

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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:study: Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: What does a T-shape symbolize in religions?

"The T-shape has held symbolic significance in various religions and cultures throughout history, particularly as a representation of the cross or crucifix in Christianity. Here are some key points about the symbolic meaning of the T-shape in religious contexts:

Christianity

In early Christianity, the T-shape was one of the earliest forms used to represent the cross or crucifix, before the more familiar cruciform shapes became widespread. Church fathers like Clement of Alexandria and Tertullian referred to the T-shape as the 'Lord's sign' (τὸ κυριακὸν σημεῖον) and rejected accusations that Christians were "cross-worshippers" (crucis religiosi).

Tertullian mentions it was already a tradition for Christians in the early 3rd century to repeatedly trace the sign of the cross (likely the T-shape) on their foreheads. The numerical value of 318 (ΤΙΗ in Greek) in Genesis 14:14 was seen as a foreshadowing of the cross (Τ=300) and Jesus (ΙΗ=18).

Ancient Religions

At the archaeological site of Göbekli Tepe (c. 9500 BCE), the T-shaped pillars are among the most prominent features, likely representing anthropomorphic figures, deities, or ancestors in the belief system of that prehistoric society. The T-shape may have symbolized a complex of ideas in ancient Egyptian religion, including the solar orb, the sky god, humanity, and blood/life (as seen in the Tyet symbol).

In some ancient Near Eastern cultures, the pairing of pillars or objects represented a 'binary basis' and dualistic mythological perception of natural phenomena. So while the symbolic meaning evolved, the T-shape carried profound spiritual and cosmological significance for many ancient religions, eventually becoming strongly associated with the crucifix as one of the earliest representations of the cross in Christianity."

See also: https://ubannotated.com/main-menu/anima ... ekli-tepe/
Super informative "Gobekli Tepe Report" by Halbert Katzen

Note: Jesus' cross was closer to T-shape with portion of pole just above
the horizontal beam where his "Jesus of Nazareth" sign was nailed.


:study: Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: When was Gobekli Tepe developed?


"Göbekli Tepe was developed and occupied during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic period, from around 9500 BCE to 8000 BCE. The earliest exposed structures at the site date back to around 9500-9000 BCE, making Göbekli Tepe one of the oldest known monumental structures built by humans. The key points regarding the development and occupation of Göbekli Tepe are:

The site was first occupied around 11,000 BCE, but the monumental circular structures were built later, between 9500-9000 BCE. Göbekli Tepe reached its peak of construction and occupation between around 9600-8200 BCE. The final building phases took place around 8000 BCE, after which the site was deliberately buried.

Radiocarbon dating indicates the site was occupied by hunter-gatherer societies, with no evidence of an agricultural-based civilization during its development and use. The large circular structures, containing massive carved T-shaped pillars, are considered the oldest known monumental religious/ritual structures built by humans.

So in summary, while hunter-gatherers first settled the region around 11,000 BCE, the iconic monumental structures of Göbekli Tepe were developed and constructed primarily during the period of 9500-8000 BCE.


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:study: Q: What usually happens when people flee religion?

(Perplexity) "Religion often provides a sense of meaning, purpose, and a framework for understanding life's challenges ... While leaving one's religion can be a difficult and complex process, many individuals also report feeling a sense of empowerment, self-acceptance, and authenticity as a result of living in alignment with their beliefs and values."

:idea: Considering indwelling God presence and surrounding spiritual forces, one's current religion may not reflect the greater authenticity. After all, this universe mandates free will to experience this mortal life while developing God-centered beliefs and values.


:sunflower: New term for simplicity of organization:

Urantia Fellowship Association (UFA)

Independent associations of Urantia Book readers,
organized to study and disseminate this planet's
fifth epochal revelation.

Note: Careful selection of font and design will communicate
"Fellowship" is not directly related to the large organizations.


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:study: This AI's summary of online information about God ...

"The people around an individual can influence their beliefs." hints that
living one's religion can be greater influence than proselytizing it. ;)


Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: What do most humans believe about God?

"Based on the search results, here are the key points about what most humans believe about God:

Belief in God is widespread, but views vary significantly: In Western Europe, fewer people believe in the God of the Bible compared to belief in some other higher power or spiritual. In the U.S., about 80% of Christians say they believe in God as described in the Bible, while others believe in a different higher power.

Those who believe in the biblical God tend to view God as: All-loving, all-knowing (omniscient), and all-powerful (omnipotent). Actively involved in people's lives - protecting, rewarding, and communicating with them. Determining what happens in their lives and having the power to direct or change everything.

Those who believe in a non-biblical higher power or spiritual force generally see it as: Less personal and less involved in their lives. Still loving and knowing, but to a lesser degree than the biblical God.

Beliefs vary by religious affiliation and demographics: Evangelical and historically black Protestant traditions have higher rates of belief in the biblical God compared to mainline Protestants and Catholics. Younger Americans are more likely to not believe in any higher power compared to older generations. Political affiliation correlates with different beliefs about God.

Many people, including some who identify as Christian, view religious belief as a matter of personal opinion rather than objective truth. For many, belief in God provides comfort, meaning, and a way to cope with death and the unknown. It's important to note that these findings primarily reflect views in Western countries, particularly the United States and Europe, and may not represent global beliefs about God.


(Q: How do Jews and religiously unaffiliated people view God compared to Christians?

Based on the search results, here are the key differences in how Jews, religiously unaffiliated people, and Christians view God:

Belief in God: Christians, particularly evangelical Protestants, have the highest rates of belief in the God of the Bible. Jews have lower rates of belief in the biblical God compared to Christians. Religiously unaffiliated people ('Nones') have the lowest rates of belief in God overall.

Nature of God: Christians tend to view God as described in the Bible - all-knowing, all-powerful, and actively involved in people's lives. Jews are more likely to believe in some other higher power or spiritual force rather than the God of the Bible. Only 26% of U.S. Jews say they believe in 'God as described in the Bible,' while 50% believe in some other spiritual force. Religiously unaffiliated people, if they believe in a higher power, often view it as less personal and less involved in human affairs.

Importance of belief: For many Christians, belief in God is central to their faith. For Jews, belief in God is often less central to their identity. Many Jews, especially secular or cultural Jews, may not believe in God at all but still strongly identify as Jewish. Religiously unaffiliated people, by definition, do not base their identity on belief in God.

Diversity of beliefs: There is significant diversity in beliefs about God within Judaism, ranging from Orthodox Jews (93% believe in the God of the Bible) to Reform Jews (18% believe in the biblical God) and Jews of no religion. Christians generally have more uniform beliefs about God across denominations, though there are still variations. Unaffiliated people have the most diverse range of beliefs, from atheism to various forms of spirituality.

Approach to religious texts: Christians tend to take a more literal approach to biblical descriptions of God. Many Jews, particularly non-Orthodox, may take a less literal approach to biblical descriptions of God. Unaffiliated people generally do not use religious texts as a primary source for understanding God or spirituality.

In summary, while Christians tend to have the strongest belief in a biblical God, Jews and the religiously unaffiliated are more likely to have diverse views ranging from belief in other spiritual forces to atheism, with less emphasis on the importance of belief in God for their identity or worldview."


Q: How is belief in God changing in this new millennium?

Based on the search results, there are a few key points about how belief in God is changing in the new millennium:

God's fundamental strategy and plan has not changed, according to some Christian perspectives. People are still called to respond to Christ by faith and begin a relationship with God. However, there are ongoing debates and discussions about the role of faith in the modern world, as evidenced by studies examining God, faith, and the new millennium. Some Christian groups, particularly American Evangelicals, remain committed to specific eschatological views like the idea of an earthly millennial age beginning after Christ's Second Coming.

There is a recognition that despite entering a new millennium, humanity still faces spiritual challenges. As one source notes, 'Today, we stand on the brink of yet a new millennium and wonder with Jeremiah, 'The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved.' The dawn of the new millennium has sparked some speculations about the end times among certain religious groups, though the article argues there is nothing inherently sacred about the turn of a millennium.

There appears to be a trend of re-examining traditional eschatological views. For instance, some evangelicals are beginning to question aspects of dispensationalism, a system of biblical interpretation that gained popularity in the 20th century. The article suggests a move away from setting specific dates for Christ's return or declaring the current generation as the "terminal" one, advocating instead for a focus on what is truly important for salvation and spiritual growth.

While these points don't directly address global trends in belief, they suggest that the new millennium has prompted some reflection and reassessment of religious beliefs, particularly within Christianity. However, the core aspects of faith and the call to a relationship with God remain constant for many believers."


Q: How does belief in an afterlife associate with belief in God?

Based on the search results, there are several key associations between belief in an afterlife and belief in God:

Correlation with religious beliefs: Belief in an afterlife is common among religious people and highly prevalent in countries with strong religious traditions, such as the USA and countries with Catholic majorities.

Psychological impact: Belief in an afterlife, particularly pleasant afterlife beliefs (e.g., reunion with loved ones), is positively associated with life satisfaction, well-being, and feelings of tranquility. This suggests that afterlife beliefs often accompany and reinforce belief in a benevolent God.

Variation in afterlife concepts: Different religions have varying concepts of the afterlife, but many share the idea of polar opposites like heaven and hell. These concepts are often tied to belief in a God who judges or determines one's fate after death.

Natural predisposition: Research suggests that humans may have natural tendencies to believe in both gods and an afterlife. This indicates that these beliefs may be interconnected in human cognition.

Persistence across cultures: The belief in some form of life after death is one of the oldest concepts in human history and persists across various cultures. This widespread belief often accompanies belief in supernatural agents or gods.

Non-religious afterlife beliefs: Interestingly, some individuals who don't believe in God may still hold beliefs about an afterlife. For example, some atheists and agnostics have reported near-death experiences, despite their lack of belief in a deity.

Developmental aspects: Research on children's beliefs suggests that young children find it easier to believe in superhuman properties (like those attributed to God) and may continue to believe in all-seeing, all-knowing supernatural agents even as they develop more realistic views of human limitations.

Dualistic thinking: Studies indicate that people across cultures instinctively believe that some part of their mind, soul, or spirit lives on after death. This dualistic thinking often aligns with belief in a God or gods who exist beyond the physical realm.

In summary, while belief in an afterlife doesn't always necessitate belief in God, the two concepts are often closely linked in many religious and cultural contexts. Both beliefs seem to tap into fundamental aspects of human cognition and psychology, providing comfort, meaning, and a framework for understanding existence beyond physical death."


Q: What societal influences limit belief in God and religion?

Based on the search results, several societal influences can limit belief in God and religion:

Socioeconomic status (SES): Higher levels of education and wealth are associated with lower levels of belief in divine involvement and control. However, this relationship is not uniform and can be moderated by religious involvement.

Social circles: The people around an individual can influence their beliefs. Being surrounded by people with cynical or limited worldviews can restrict one's own perspective.

Societal standards: Society can impose standards that generate limiting beliefs, which may include skepticism towards religious ideas.

Educational influences: Higher education may lead some individuals to question or dismiss the idea of divine intervention in the world.

Material success: Accumulation of wealth might lead some to believe that divine intervention is not necessary for success.

Reduced social conformity: Non-religious individuals may show lower levels of social conformity, making them less likely to adopt beliefs based on faith or social pressure.

Cognitive development: As individuals grow and develop more realistic views of human limitations, they may question supernatural beliefs.

Disappointment or negative experiences: Past setbacks or disappointments, including those related to religious expectations, can lead to limiting beliefs about God or religion.

Fear of failure or rejection: These emotions can prevent individuals from fully exploring or embracing religious beliefs.

Cultural shifts: Changes in societal norms and values over time can influence religious beliefs and practices.

It's important to note that these influences can vary greatly depending on the individual and their specific cultural context. Additionally, religious involvement and personal experiences can moderate the impact of some of these factors."


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:hithere While this AI develops its skills in free verse poetry, we can still appreciate its better than human grasp
of Jesus' prayer. That Jesus' taught "a more personal, experiential approach to faith" is still a rare message
in institutional religions of authority, rituals, and formalities! :roll:


Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

“Our Father who is in heaven, hallowed be your name.”
What is the significance of this prayer in the Urantia Book?

"The prayer 'Our Father who is in heaven, hallowed be your name' holds significant importance in the Urantia Book as it represents Jesus' approach to prayer and his teachings about the relationship between humans and God. Here are some key points about its significance:

Pattern of reverence: This prayer demonstrates Jesus' deep reverence for God. The Urantia Book notes that 'The Master was a pattern of reverence. The prayer of even his youth began, 'Our Father who is in heaven, hallowed be your name.'

Direct communication with God: Jesus encouraged direct communion with God, referring to Him as 'Father.' This emphasizes the personal relationship between humans and the divine.

Recognition of God's sovereignty: By saying 'hallowed be your name,' the prayer acknowledges God's holiness and supreme authority.

Simplicity and sincerity: Jesus taught his followers to approach God with simple, heartfelt prayers rather than elaborate rituals or formalities.

Universal application: This prayer was part of Jesus' broader teachings that were meant to be accessible and applicable to all people, regardless of their background or status.

Contrast with traditional practices:
Jesus' approach to prayer and worship often contrasted with the more rigid, traditional religious practices of his time. He emphasized personal experience and direct connection with God over adherence to established rituals.

Foundation for spiritual growth:
The prayer serves as a starting point for developing a deeper, more meaningful relationship with God, encouraging believers to move beyond mere intellectual belief to actual spiritual experience.

In essence, this prayer encapsulates Jesus' teachings about God's nature, humanity's relationship with the divine, and the importance of sincere, reverent communication with the heavenly Father. It represents a shift from traditional, authoritative religious practices to a more personal, experiential approach to faith."


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

(evidence this AI is firmly centered on the UB text as gifted to the planet)

:hithere Don't expect to find UB text that promotes such communication!
That is not the purpose of this "fifth epochal revelation". 8)


Re: https://www.perplexity.ai/

Q: Does any Urantia Book text refer (or allude) to human communication with non-earth civilizations,
with humans now departed from earth, with beings in advanced realms, or with spiritual practices
that permit such communication?


"Based on the search results provided, there does not appear to be any direct reference in The Urantia Book to human communication with non-Earth civilizations, departed humans, beings in advanced realms, or practices that permit such communication. The Urantia Book seems to focus more on cosmic history, spiritual philosophy, and religious teachings rather than describing specific practices for communicating with extraterrestrial or spiritual entities.

The search results provide an overview of the book's contents and structure, but do not mention anything about the types of communication you asked about. That said, The Urantia Book does discuss concepts like spiritual realms, celestial beings, and a cosmology involving multiple inhabited worlds. However, it does not appear to promote or describe methods for humans to directly communicate with such entities or civilizations.

It's worth noting that The Urantia Book itself claims to have been authored by celestial beings and transmitted to humans, which could be seen as a form of communication from advanced realms. However, this is presented as a one-time revelation rather than an ongoing practice available to readers.

In summary, while The Urantia Book contains extensive spiritual and cosmological teachings, it does not seem to include information about humans actively communicating with non-Earth entities or realms in the ways you described. The book appears to focus more on presenting its own spiritual narrative and cosmology rather than promoting such communication practices."


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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

:sunflower: Revelation by association ...

Best shared as the elevator ascends to the fifth floor
(subtle reminder that Jesus was here not long ago):

"The Urantia Book is our planet's fifth epochal revelation - Jesus was our fourth."

:sunny: Next morning meditation on these "epochal revelations" ...
All five tell the same story but with increasing enlightenment about our intelligent universe.
Jesus (Michael) has become increasingly important in these revelations, suggesting that
the future of UB dissemination belongs to those who keep him in the story. ;)

"Many past events of religious revelation, but only five of epochal significance:
1. Dalamatian teachings, 2. Edenic teachings, 3. Melchizedek of Salem,
4. Jesus of Nazareth, 5. Urantia Papers" (92:4.4)

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Re: The benefits of reading the Urantia Book

Post by Amigoo »

Re: https://phys.org/news/2024-07-history-c ... ative.html
"Geneticists are rewriting the narrative of Neanderthals and other ancient humans"

"Neanderthals, once stereotyped as slow-moving and dim-witted, are now seen as skilled hunters and tool makers
who treated each other's injuries with sophisticated techniques and were well adapted to thrive in the cold European weather."

"The hominins who are our most direct ancestors split from the Neanderthal family tree about 600,000 years ago,
then evolved our modern physical characteristics about 250,000 years ago."

"To date, most genetic data suggests that modern humans evolved in Africa 250,000 years ago, stayed put for the next 200,000 years,
and then decided to disperse out of Africa 50,000 years ago and go on to people the rest of the world"


:idea: However, the UB reveals that Neanderthals had traveled far and wide long before this conjectured African departure:

"850,000 years ago ... the mixed descendants of this improved Badonite stock appeared on the stage of action
as an apparently new people - the Neanderthal race." (64:3.5)

"The Neanderthalers were excellent fighters, and they traveled extensively. They gradually spread from the highland centers
in northwest India to France on the west, China on the east, and even down into northern Africa. They dominated the world
for almost half a million years until the times of the migration of the evolutionary races of color." (64:4.1)


Rod :)
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