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Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 1:31 am
by Sandy
I think this is going to be supper tonight! Thanks Rod!
xxSandy

Oat Bran Cookie Crumble

Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:16 am
by Amigoo
Oat Bran Cookie Crumble

When neat little cookie shapes are just too formal. ;)

:roll Ingredients:

2 cups light oat bran
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
3 xlg egg whites
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup light olive oil
1 cup chopped walnuts
2/3 cup dried currants

:arrow: Directions:

Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Lightly oil a cookie sheet.

In a large bowl, mix oat bran, baking powder, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

In a small bowl, whisk egg whites until foamy. Stir into oat bran mixture
until oat bran is well-moistened, then stir in brown sugar, salt, and oil.
Fold in walnuts and currants until well-distributed.

Spread mixture on oiled cookie sheet and bake about 20 minutes,
or until crumble pieces are lightly browned. Allow to cool 5 min.,
then lift with spatula onto another cookie sheet (or metal bowl)
to cool completely.

Serve with demitasse Crumbles Spoon. :roll:

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:52 am
by Sandy
Looks like another must try!
Thanks Rod!
xxSandy

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 8:56 am
by Amigoo
Sandy,

I discovered that there only 3 servings in the Oat Bran Cookie Crumble :roll:
and put this recipe on my Watch List: Watch but don't touch when you're in
the munchin' mood and a bowl of OBCC sits on your lap in front of the TV.
(the wheelbarrow of popcorn is a satisfying substitute). :roll

About those barley grits* ...

This is an excellent grain for moist, "spooner" casseroles. I tried several variations
including spelt flour or oat bran, but the casserole gets "gummy" easily. Of course,
more flour or oat bran could be added to make a drier loaf ... but "spooner"
seems the better option for barley grits that want to stay moist.

* In a medium sauce pan, simmer 2 2/3 cups water and slowly stir in 1 cup grits.
Cook about 10 min., stirring occasionally, then prepare the casserole
(I tested eggs, chopped veggies, shredded cheese; baked 55 min.)

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 12:58 am
by Sandy
Oh MY! Then I had better be wary of the Oat bran cookie Crumble. :shock: I suspect I would easily follow your example, Rod. I do love to make cookies though and sadly these past months see me avoiding this due to the inability to know when enough is enough. :roll: sigh
I do love my grits though... :mrgreen: and this revised casserole ticks all my "southern upbringing" boxes for YUM! :sunflower:
xxSandy

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 10:09 pm
by Amigoo
:sunny: A diabetes discovery journey ...

An unexpected benefit of barley grits (especially when added to soups and stews):
Because these pieces of grain are very small and moist when cooked, one does not
chew them so much (take longer to digest, giving slower blood sugar response!)

I concocted a satisfying chowder with a cup of cooked barley grits by adding
a 32oz container of roasted red pepper soup, large diced onion, cup of diced
jalapeño peppers, 15oz can of organic corn, cup of Mexican salsa, 1 tsp salt,
2 tsp paprika, 1 tsp garlic granules, 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper,
2 tbsp dried cilantro, and 2 tbsp virgin olive oil.

The kitchen sink was full so I couldn't add it to the chowder. :roll:
Microwave chopped onion and jalapeños for faster preparation.

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 12:29 am
by Sandy
Thanks for that tidbit of information and soup suggestion. I will definitely put barley grits on my shopping list. We so appreciate anything we can do to help control G's blood sugar. :bana:
xxSandy
Do you think if I cannot find B grits I can make my own by grinding whole barley?

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 2:00 am
by Amigoo
Sandy,

I'm testing pearl barley (from Bob's Red Mill), ground into grits,
and just ordered (from Shiloh Farms) hulled barley, ground into grits.
So, these sellers had machines to grind barley.


Re: https://bestchoiceproducts.com/products ... ercial-new

I might order a manual grinder like this once I use up the two cases :!: of mail order grits.
I've read that hulless barley is the more nutritional grain, then hulled barley, then pearl barley.

The better glycemic response is why I'm suddenly fond of barley (even more than brown rice).
Simmered barley with microwaved veggies (onions and asparagus) with 2 tbsp virgin olive oil,
1/2 tsp garlic granules, and salt & pepper will visit my table (or TV tray :roll: ) often.

Because digestion speed is important to blood sugar control, any grain too finely ground
may be troublesome (as are most flours). ;)

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 8:02 pm
by Amigoo
Sandy,

The Shiloh Farms barley is more coarse - I'll use the Red Mill barley for creamy soups
and the Shiloh Farms barley for simple recipes, featuring additional mastication. :roll:

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 8:54 pm
by Amigoo
:sunny: A diabetes discovery journey ...

Re: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... es-35.html

The subtlety of this information is that any food (or liquid) that digests quickly
might cause a sudden rise in blood sugar for diabetics and many pre-diabetics.

While some of these foods cannot be totally eliminated from daily fare,
smaller portions can help minimize the negative glycemic reponse. ;)

Been there! Still doing that! :roll:

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Sun Apr 02, 2017 9:06 am
by Sandy
Hi Rod,
Hope you're having a great week end. I didn't have any luck so far finding the barley grits when we were out Friday but it was only two of the major grocery stores. I might be able to find it at the health food store. I will love anything that will help George control his blood sugar. Thanks for the great information!

xxSandy

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 1:23 am
by Amigoo
:sunny: A diabetes discovery journey ...

Re: QALA! (Quick Acting, Long Acting; pronounced "Voilà!")
Insight about carbohydrates (especially, ground grains)

A good focus for diabetes management is the current amount of blood sugar: From whence this sugar? from quick-acting carbs (easily digested, causing rapid increase in blood sugar) or from long-acting carbs (slow digesting, but still causing excess blood sugar). The difference is that medicine taken to help eliminate excess blood sugar is not usually at peak levels 24-7 (non-diabetics have 24-7 insulin response to excess blood sugar). ;)

Since urination is complementary to elimination of excess blood sugar (via natural kidney function), staying hydrated is important, especially when diabetes medicine is at peak levels. For diabetics, unusual increase in urination (relative to food consumed more than quantity of liquids) can be a reliable indicator of excess blood sugar (IMO). :o

So, successful diabetes management seems to require "carb pacing" - knowing what/when carbs are entering the bloodstream and how long one's recent dose of diabetes medicine will be effective. The body requires carbs for energy, but excess carbs might be converted to blood sugar faster than it can be used by cells. "Carb pacing" of foods preferred with complementary hydration should lead to "QALA! Voilà!" (say repeatedly and loudly).

Perhaps, the oft-voiced exuberance of certain two-legged mammals with good blood sugar control
... or their energetic, mating-associated, emotional satisfactions. :roll:

Rod :D

EZ Black Bean Dip

Posted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:01 pm
by Amigoo
EZ Black Bean Dip

:roll Ingredients:

2 15oz cans black beans, rinsed
1/4 cup Olive Oil & Vinegar Dressing
2 tbsp raw apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp dried oregano (or cilantro)
1/2 tsp garlic granules
1/2 tsp cumin powder
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup minced, sweet onion

:arrow: Directions:

In a large mixing bowl, hand mash black beans, then stir in remaining ingredients
(except onion) in the order listed. Fold in minced onion, distributing thoroughly.

8) For individual presentation, make a hole in the center of a scoup of bean dip
and fill with virgin olive oil. Accompany with cherry tomatoes, green onions,
parboiled red bell pepper slices, and tortilla chips (or multigrain bread).

:idea: Make lotsa dip - this is also an appealing breakfast dish
when served warm with freshly baked bread or rolls!

Rod :D

Oven-Simmered Butternut

Posted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 5:41 am
by Amigoo
Oven-Simmered Butternut

After several oven-baked butternuts that were too dry, even when covered with foil,
steaming came to mind. But why bother with the cutting when the whole squash
can be oven-simmered in lotsa water in a covered stockpot? :roll

For a medium butternut squash, one hour at 400F degrees, then another hour
at 375F degrees produced the desired produce :roll: , all moist 'n tasty.

Not culinary rocket science - adjust cooking temperature and time as desired
... but cool a bit with fresh water before handling. ;)

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:54 pm
by Amigoo
:sunny: A diabetes discovery journey ...

Re: QALA! (Quick Acting, Long Acting; pronounced "Voilà!")
Insight about carbohydrates (especially, ground grains)

Disappointed that a "wheelbarrow of popcorn" and hearty portion of good grains (barley grits) easily caused a rise in blood sugar, I was inspired to keep researching. After all, these dietary options (popcorn, barley) provide good nutrition, including fiber! But the complementary carbs still need to be managed. :o

:study: Long story short (and experiential opinion) ...

With insulin resistance, a body needs a steady stream of carbohydrates (for energy) ... but only in proportion to the body's ability to process the carbs (re: insulin resistance and insufficient insulin). Good grains, with their slower digestion, help provide a steady stream of carbs. :roll

Since diabetes medicines can help reduce (eliminate) excess blood sugar and improve cell's insulin receptivity, the specific medicine taken should be understood. If the medicine only reduces excess blood sugar, the body may still lack sufficient energy - more carbs are needed but insulin resistance (and/or insufficiency) limits the conversion of the available carbs into glucose, a primary energy source. :(

Obviously, some "magic" is required to improve the body's insulin receptivity; insulin injections which increase insulin quantity are one solution ... sometimes; too much insulin can have both short term and long term negative consequences. Fortunately, there is "magic" in exercise:

:idea: Re: https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/ ... nsitivity/

"During exercise, your body burns glycogen, a form of glucose that is stored in your muscles. After exercise, your muscles replenish their glycogen stores with glucose from the bloodstream. The more glycogen that is burned during a bout of activity, the longer the body’s insulin sensitivity is improved."

So ... Spring has arrived in Texas with plentiful rain, making mowing the lawn (especially with a push reel mower) great exercise! But how to get the energy and motivation for the weeks just ahead? For each mowing job, a big fat chocolate chip cookie with a cup of strong coffee might work! :roll:

Rod :stars:

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:24 pm
by Amigoo
:sunny: A diabetes discovery journey ...
A carbohydrate is a carbohydrate ...

Certain foods and their serving sizes:
1/4 cup barley grits: 34g
2/3 cup frozen green peas: 12g
1 slice sprouted multigrain bread: 15 g

Curious why I was getting more blood sugar response from barley grits, a grain I considered a healthy carbohydrate for breakfast, I reviewed the carbohydrate contribution of these serving sizes (foods that I often select for breakfast/brunch).

Long story short: the more carbohydrates, the higher the blood sugar; end of story, plain 'n simple :!: Of course, individual foods, their varying nutrition, and digestion rates are not so easily analyzed; such analysis gets more complicated when other foods are present in the meal. :?

:cheers: However, "a carbohydrate is a carbohydrate" seems to be good focus for blood sugar control. With recent months of observation (relative to glucometer scores), I suspect that carbohydrates in a serving size should stay under 20g (especially for grains and beans; reduce serving size if necessary). Also, common diabetes advice recommends that protein and fat be included in any meal (even snacks) to decrease digestion rate of carbohydrates.

:roll So, hot-air-popped corn needs a bit of butter (or olive oil). Great news!
... since this snack provides a good amount of beneficial fiber! ;) ;)

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Sat Apr 08, 2017 3:56 am
by Sandy
Hi Rod,
:roll So, hot-air-popped corn needs a bit of butter (or olive oil). Great news!
... since this snack provides a good amount of beneficial fiber! ;) ;)
What if you added a half a dozen raw almonds to the finished product... hmm you've got me thinking. (almost always a good thing. ;) )

Well this is great news! I'm off to pop some buttered popcorn! :bana:
xxSandy

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Sat Apr 08, 2017 4:48 am
by Amigoo
Sandy,

A good rule of thumb for a wheelbarrow of popcorn:
A stick of butter (113g) has about 800 calories. :roll:

:idea: Measurement seems necessary to prevent "project creep"
as the snackin' days roll by. ;) When I imagine myself as
a Butter Barista when free-drenchin' poppins, I have to
start measuring again with the next batch.

Rod :stars:

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:28 am
by Sandy
Hi Rod,
Oh how I love butter...sigh...have experienced " the creep" many times. Yep will remember your caution and apply oils sparingly. ;) :)
xxSandy

BC Porridge

Posted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 4:10 am
by Amigoo
BC Porridge

:roll Ingredients:
2 2/3 cups water
1 rounded cup BC grits*
1/2 tsp salt

* barley and corn grits (coarse ground corn; "polenta")
mixed in 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups proportion.

:arrow: Directions:

In a medium sauce pan, heat water to simmering, then slowly stir in BC grits;
stir occasionally about 10 min. or until mixture is like porridge; stir in salt,
then cover pan, remove from heat, and let mixture rest 10 min.

Serve with butter (or olive oil), salt & pepper ;)

Tip: Barley should be ground like the polenta.

Rod :D

Barlioca

Posted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:34 am
by Amigoo
Barlioca

A barley-based "tapioca" pudding (actually, porridge) that is satisfying
as both hot cereal and dessert; a dessert that may be served cold. 8)

("new & improved" version of Barlioca Pudding* and more like dessert!)
* http://board.1111angels.com/viewtopic.p ... 75#p193586

:roll Ingredients:

2 cups water
3/4 cup barley grits
1/2 cup half & half
2 xlg egg whites
1 xlg egg
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup sugar
1/8 tsp salt

:arrow: Directions:

In a small bowl (or glass 2-cup measuring cup), whip eggs until foamy.

In a medium sauce pan, heat water until simmering, then stir in barley grits;
stir frequently until mixture is thick like porridge (about 10 min.).

Stir in half & half, then whipped eggs. Add remaining ingredients
and stir thoroughly, about 5 min., while mixture is simmering.

Serve warm, or cool then refrigerate in a covered container.

Tip: Finely ground barley grits are best.

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:22 am
by Amigoo
:shock: Who knew?!

I had separated a bulb of garlic into its cloves, then rinsed them several times during the day for easier peeling.
With unintended procrastination, :roll: one day of rinsing became two, then three! Now the cloves had roots! :o

Well ... the time for eating them had passed; cooking was still possible, but they still had to be peeled! :(
:idea: A convenient solution emerged from the procrastinating neurons: plant the sprouting garlic.

They're growing quickly in a deep pot in the sunroom ...
and hinting that lotsa fresh garlic will be important for health
in a troubled world. Garlic gardening couldn't be easier! ;)

Rod :D

Re: UB Cookin'

Posted: Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:14 am
by Sandy
Hey! Thanks for that, Rod! :sunflower: I am off to find a pot for my garlic bulbs. ...Hmmm in my excitement I forgot that it might be a good idea to sprout them first. :roll: :mrgreen:
Well I'm off to plant some winter spinach at the very least. :hithere
xxSandy :flower:

Orange Cacao Crumble

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:17 am
by Amigoo
Orange Cacao Crumble

Cover a small tray with plastic wrap.

In a glass quart measuring cup, microwave two 3.17oz bars 86% Dark Chocolate
(about 2 min. on high, stirring twice), then stir in 3/4 tsp organic orange oil,
then 3 1/2 cups walnut pieces.

Stir frequently until walnut pieces are completely coated with chocolate
(about 5 min.) When coated with melted chocolate, stir in 1 3/4 cups
zante currants (small raisins).

Spread mixture evenly on tray, then cover with plastic wrap.
Refrigerate overnight, then break into bite-size pieces
and refrigerate in a covered container until served.

:idea: Tips: 1) Orange oil may be omitted.
2) Break chocolate bars into small pieces for faster melting.
3) When using orange oil, serve with slices of fresh orange. :roll
4) 86% cacao chocolate is just sweet enough when combined
with zante currants ... and is not so sweet that this snack
is gobbled like candy. :roll:

Note: Quart measuring cup is just large enough for these ingredients
... with careful stirring; upside: a lickin' later bowl with handle ;)
(use smalll spatula to "lick" deeper).

Rod :D

Quinoa & Black Beans

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 10:06 pm
by Amigoo
Quinoa & Black Beans

Quinoa has great flavor and texture to complement beans!
This recipe is a starter - add other herbs & spices as desired
(and try fresh herbs instead of dried).

:roll Ingredients:

2 cups water
1 cup white quinoa, rinsed
1 tbsp dried cilantro
1/2 tsp garlic granules
1 tbsp virgin olive oil
1 med. onion, diced
1/2 tsp salt
15 oz can black beans, rinsed

:arrow: Directions:

In a medium sauce pan, bring water to simmer and stir in rinsed quinoa;
simmer 10 min., then spread onion on top, cover pan, and simmer 5 min.

Stir in remaining ingredients except black beans, then fold in beans.
Serve with cherry tomatoes and shredded cheese. :roll

Tip: Other canned beans may be substituted! ;)

Rod :D