UB Cookin'

A forum to discuss the Urantia Book.
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Amigoo
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UB Cookin'

Post by Amigoo » Wed Aug 26, 2015 6:54 pm

Sandy,

A whimsical concept, perhaps, but a separate topic for unique and healthy recipes (re: black rice) will at least keep such discussion isolated from serious UB study. The actual recipe (if not too complex) or link to it might be the best use of this discussion space; informative comments would be a plus!

About that black rice (another concept): Colorful, Crunchy Salad

Combine 3 cups cooked black rice (pre-chilled for cold salad) with 1 cup each of diced red onion and red bell pepper and 2/3 cup each of diced celery tops and cucumber. Sprinkle on 1 tbsp dried parsley, 1/2 tbsp dried oregano, 1/2 tsp garlic granules, 1/2 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp coarse black pepper. Then drizzle on 2/3 cup olive oil & vinegar dressing and carefully toss ingredients to combine. Refrigerate for several hours for best presentation.

This "recipe" is more versatile than this, so experiment with other ingredients, maintaining an enticing color/crunch contrast. Once you discover several favorite combinations, black rice will quickly become a kitchen staple!

Rod

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Blueberry Compote

Post by Amigoo » Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:55 pm

Rinse then heat in a covered, medium saucepan, 2 lbs frozen wild blueberries (or other frozen blueberries); stir occasionally until simmering. When blueberries are simmering, sprinkle on 1 tbsp sugar, stir well, then sprinkle on 2 tsp Pomona's Universal Pectin*. Stir slowly until all pectin is dissolved, then allow to cool before refrigerating in a covered container.

:idea: * Recipe first created with this product; the calcium water (another packet in the box) is not used since this compote remains refrigerated. Add more sugar if desired, one more tsp of pectin for thicker compote. Since blueberries are frozen, extra water is usually unnecessary.

Great with cottage cheese! (try cultured, lowfat) :roll

Rod

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Tasty recipes

Post by Amigoo » Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:18 pm


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EZ Preparation

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:02 am

I. Peeling garlic. 8)

Separate cloves from bulb, rinse cloves in water, drain, then let rest 5 min.; rinse again and let rest several minutes. Trim the flat end with a paring knife, but instead of cutting off end, pull down side of clove to remove the skin from one side. Pinch the pointed end with nails of your thumb and forefinger, then pull down another side of the clove; remaining skin should peel off easily.

Rinse peeled cloves, dry with a paper towel, and refrigerate in a covered container. Who knew? Multi-taskers can chat, watch TV, enjoy the sunset, etc. while peeling garlic this way. And the refrigerated cloves last for days without spoiling!

2. Not peeling boiled eggs. :cheers:

Carefully crack eggs into prepared 3- or 4-cup Pyrex bowl* (or similar brand with lid) without breaking yolks. For more egg whites, separate some yolks into another container and refrigerate for use later. Gently place bowl in a 3-qt saucepan that contains 3/4" of water.

Cover pan with lid, bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until eggs are cooked (about 25 min. for a dozen eggs; center of egg collection will be firm). Allow eggs to cool, pour off any water from bowl, cover with bowl's lid and refrigerate until used. Who knew? Egg salad preparation is much easier! (spoon cooked eggs into a deep bowl and "chop" with a pastry cutter).

:idea: * prepare bowl by lightly coating with butter or cooking oil; place a flat cooking ring under pan to minimize rocking of bowl while eggs simmer.

Rod

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Morning Millet

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:28 am

:D A satisfying dish for any meal!

In a 3-qt sauce pan containing 2 1/2 cups water, layer 1 cup of rinsed oganic millet (yellow grain), then 1 large yellow onion (chopped), and top with 2 med. yellow squash (chopped). Cover pan, bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until millet is cooked and water is absorbed (about 45 min.).

Gently stir cooked millet to combine with vegetables and serve hot (or allow to cool and refrigerate in a covered container). Try with a boiled egg per serving and condiments of salt, black pepper, butter or virgin olive oil; for brunch or special occasions, include various cheeses, cherry tomatoes, and certain fresh herbs (try parsley or cilantro). :roll

Rod

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Sprouted Lentils

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:11 am

Not a recipe but easy sprouting method! :roll

Sort (to remove discards), rinse, then soak overnight (covered by an inch of water), 1 cup of organic green lentils. Then pour lentils into a medium colander having small holes (not a mesh strainer) and rinse, distributing lentils around sides of colander. Cover with a plate or pan lid (to block light and retain moisture), set on a plate or tray*, then move to preferred counter space to sprout at room temperature. 8)

Rinse at least twice a day, distributing lentils around sides of colander as necessary. Lentils will have 1/4" sprouts in about two days (my preferred length); continue sprouting for another day or two for longer sprouts. Rinse one last time, shake colander to remove water (then drying with a paper towel helps), and refrigerate in a covered container. ;)

:idea: Sprouted lentils may be consumed raw (in salads, for example), but I usually add them to soups and stews during the final minutes of cooking. If uncertain about any bacteria in the kitchen, parboil sprouted lentils a few minutes (stir into generous amount of boiling water), then dry and refrigerate for use later.

* If colander does not have a flat bottom, place it in a pan or bowl to sprout lentils.

Rod

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Cauliflower Crust Pizza

Post by Sandy » Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:08 am

Hi Rod,
This is a great idea for a thread!! You have been busy too and I am taking all kinds of notes for use in my own kitchen. Thank you!
First of all, I love sprouted lentils. They have a spiciness to them that can really perk up a salad. We always eat them raw and uncooked to conserve the enzemes which are so helpful in healing G's pancreas. ..and other things as well.

There are so many great recipe's listed here I don't know what to fix first. Might give that blueberry compote a try since we have some in the freezer...I think we might have the pectin too but it may be too old. ( 3 years.. LOL I know I am terrible at getting rid of these kind of things.)

I have a recipe to add to the thread that came from our Aldi's weekly catalogue... I was a little leery but gave it a try and was pleasantly surprised so here goes...

Cauliflower Pizza Crust

650 g cauliflower head, trimmed and chopped
1 eggs, lightly whisked ( I used 2)
25 grams parmesan cheese
1/3 cup tomato paste
3 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
1 punnet of grape or cherry tomatoes, halved
250 gg mushrooms, sliced
handful of basil leaves


1. Process the cauliflower in a food processor until finely chopped. Place into a microwave-safe bowl, cover and microwave on high for 8-10 minutes or until very tender. Drain through a fine sieve, pressing down with a spoon to remove excess liquid. Combine the cauliflower, egg and parmesan in a bowl.

2. Preheat oven to 230 degrees Celsius (about 425 F) Line a pizza tray with baking paper. Press cauliflower mixture into the tray and bake for 20 minutes until golden, (I don't think I cooked mine this high so keep and eye on it the first time you make it to make sure)

3. Spread tomato paste over the base and sprinkle with mozzarella cheese and sliced tomatoes and mushrooms. Bake until cheese is fully melted and tomatoes are blistered, then remove from oven and add basil leaves.
.....

I must admit that I used my own ingredients for the sauce and toppings but I was impressed despite myself at the cauliflower crust which could easily be tweaked by someone who really knows their cooking with favourite complementary spices. Truly not a bad alternative to heavy flour crusts (which of course I adore! :roll: ) if one is watching their weight or on a low carb diet.

Thanks for the great cooking tips! :)
xxSandy
Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.

~ Chief Seattle ~

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Re: UB Cookin'

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:28 am

Sandy,

LOL: I might not complete the Cauliflower Pizza Crust recipe often - the ingredients
(except for eggs and tomato paste) sound good enough for a salad! :roll:

:idea: Posting suggestion: change Subject to recipe name when posting (or commenting).

Rod

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Re: UB Cookin'

Post by Sandy » Thu Aug 27, 2015 10:17 am

I like your suggestion, Rod! It'll make it tons easier to find the recipe you are looking for. :thumright:
xxSandy
Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.

~ Chief Seattle ~

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Sorting dried beans

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:09 pm

Tossing dried beans in a bowl to find discards takes time and is not so easy.
Next time, try a white plastic serving tray (about 12" x 16"):

Pour beans onto tray, tap side of tray to distribute beans evenly, then check for discards.
Perform these steps until all discards are located (usually within four or five attempts).
Carefully stir beans with hand (then tap tray) between attempts.

To return beans to a bowl or pan, cup hands and grasp adjacent sides of tray,
using the corner as a funnel. With just a little practice, no beans escape!

Rod :D

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Fresh cilantro pesto

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:43 pm

8) Not exactly "pesto" but a way to minimize discarding not-so-fresh cilantro due to spoilage in a refrigerator (often caused by moisture problems).

Pack a food processor bowl (mine is quart size) with sorted and rinsed fresh cilantro (remove leaves and discard thicker stems). Add 2 or 3 cloves of fresh garlic (sliced), then drizzle on 2 tbsp virgin olive oil and 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice. Top with a 15oz can of rinsed cannellini beans (good flavor/texture complement to cilantro), then process mixture to desired consistency. Pamersan cheese, for example, is a tasty option - blend in 1/2 cup.

Using a spatula, scoup pesto into small glass bowls for freezing (or chilled serving bowls, if using immediately). This mixture freezes so well (and has good quality when thawed) that preparing a lot becomes the norm. For best quality, prepare the same day that cilantro is purchased.

BTW: Fresh cilantro and beans (pectin) are sometimes suggested for heavy metals detoxification. ;)

Rod :D

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Iced beer

Post by Amigoo » Thu Aug 27, 2015 7:05 pm

While beer over ice may sound counterintuitive (even sacrilegious), a small amount in a frosted mug or sturdy glass is rarely noticed. Add about 1/3 cup of water to the mug or glass, then freeze. Caution: too much water might freeze and crack the mug (freezing the mug at a slight angle minimizes this problem).

This iced beer method is well-appreciated on hot days when beer is not well-chilled and/or beer bottle koozies are not available.

Rod :D

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Re: UB Cookin'

Post by Sandy » Fri Aug 28, 2015 2:56 am

Thanks Rod,for the new sorting tip and that pesto recipe. I have a question on the latter. When you say toss in a 15 0z can of cannoli beans...do you drain and rinse them first or toss in liquid beans and all? I like the idea of making a fair bit of it and freezing some for future dates.
Sounds like a good one! and I could use a bit of detox. ;) :roll: :)
xxSandy
I'm not a beer drinker..bleah.. :lol: hmmm... but doo like beer muffins. :mrgreen:
Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.

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Fresh cilantro pesto

Post by Amigoo » Fri Aug 28, 2015 4:50 am

Sandy,

Rinse and drain the cannellini beans; when convenient, chill them before opening the can. I just bought fresh cilantro tonight and put a can of beans in the freezer (I'll make the pesto in a few hours). One can per batch of pesto seems best.

Cookin' Caveat: it's easy to consume a lot of this - 1/3 cup is probably a good serving (as pesto).

Rod :D

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Fresh cilantro pesto

Post by Amigoo » Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:57 am

:oops: Downsize that serving!
I should have said 1/4 cup is a good serving (as pesto).

Rod

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Mini-Mounds of Ruis

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 4:07 am

Re: http://www.breadexperience.com/minimounds-of-ruis/

A very unique, easy, and nutritious rye-bread-like thing (LOL).
Try with a few teaspoons of caraway seeds (add last).

:lol: Speaking of LOL ...

The Comments on that web page reflect attemtps to "redirect" this super-easy batter. But the Porcupine Pizza was so unique (with intense flavors) that it was continually nudged to the end of a relative's Christmas buffet (where guests hoped that it would "accidentally" fall into the trash can ... or onto the floor where a dog might chase it outside and down the hill). :roll:

After the party, I discretely chaperoned it back home, where it was tossed into the trash can. However, this Porcupine Pizza recipe is actually a good complement to wild game and highly-seasoned meats! ;)

As for the Mini-Mounds, if you like rye flour, this is a good recipe for quick & easy, non-traditional rye bread!

Rod :D

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Re: UB Cookin'

Post by Sandy » Sat Aug 29, 2015 5:02 am

Perfect timing Rod, :D
I am making G some stew tonight and your mini Rye bread rounds would be a perfect accompaniment. I'll let you know how they come out.
Thank you!
xxSandy
Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.

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Food processor cleanup

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 5:38 am

Having decided that washing dishes by hand is not my favorite kitchen activity (but is energy-efficient, relative to the cycles of an automatic dishwasher), I'm always attentive to new ways of minimizing cleanup:

:idea: Whenever a food processor bowl can be loaded without the top, and doesn't need additional ingredients during processing (like the Fresh Cilantro Pesto), a loose sheet of plastic wrap might be placed over the bowl* before the top is locked into place. Lightly press on the plastic wrap so that it's not tightly stretched then cut by the the top when locked into place.

When processing is completed, carefully remove the plastic wrap and discard. The top will need less cleanup (still important because small food particles might have accumulated on the top or its edge). 8)

:roll: Obviously, if you've bonded with your dishwasher (the machine), skip the wrap.

* use of plastic wrap is dependent on processor design - if in doubt, don't use the wrap. For example, if significant force is needed to lock the top or the wrap will jam into a tight space where removal will be difficult. ;)

Rod

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Mini-Mounds of Ruis

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:08 am

Sandy,

The 10-min. rest before baking can be reduced to 5 min. (according to the last batch I baked).
:idea: ... or even skip this rest and see how they bake.

These freeze well! To reheat, wrap one in a paper towel and microwave on high about 10 sec. ;)
(actually, I prefer them this way - warm, slightly moist, and aromatic)

Rod :D

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Re: UB Cookin'

Post by Sandy » Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:29 am

Thanks Rod, I am glad to hear that they freeze well because We ill have plenty of them for just the two of us! I am excited to make them. We both love rye bread. I feel it was meant to be as I had all the ingredients on hand. :bana: The stew has been in the oven for an hour and more time to go but wow...is it smelling good! I will let them rest the 5 minutes this time just to make sure I don't blow it...but next recipe I will skip the rest and put them right to work! :mrgreen:

I'm a hand washer and to tell you the truth, strange person that I am, I sort of like this chore. It is one of those mindless chores where I can zone out and relax and sometimes get messages in this manner. Now don't get me wrong. I can't look at a huge pile of sticky pots and dishes and say, "Oh boy!" and what is it about washing silver ware that is so annoying! :lol:

Love the plastic wrap processor trick! The worst part of cleaning a processor is the lid so will definitely be using this one in the future.

Have a good week end!
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Sandy
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Food processor cleanup

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:49 am

Sandy,

I couldn't resist your comment about washing silverware ...

I've had a dish pan full of dirty stainless steel utensils, soaking in soapy water for two weeks (a record!). Of course, I change the water occasionally :roll: but kept postponing the chore ... until today. Fortunately, the metal tolerated this soaking, but I did lose part of a plastic(?) handle on a knife.

Rod

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Baked Pumpkin Pudding

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:00 am

Baked Pumpkin Pudding

Ingredients:

2 15-oz.cans pumpkin puree
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
3 large egg whites
2 large eggs
2/3 cup half & half
3/4 cup low-fat milk*
1/2 tsp vanilla

* Decrease milk to 1/2 cup if canned pumpkin is very moist.

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine pumpkin, brown sugar, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, and salt. Stir well to combine.

In a medium bowl, beat eggs then add half & half, milk and vanilla; whisk to combine.

Pour egg mixture into pumpkin mixture and stir to combine, then whisk thoroughly.

Pour pumpkin mixture into 2 1/2 quart casserole, reduce oven to 325 degrees and bake uncovered 1 hr. 20 min. (or until center is slightly firm).

Allow to cool, then serve warm with whipped cream and chopped walnuts (optional).

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Coconut Honey Spread

Post by Amigoo » Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:20 am

Coconut Honey Spread :roll

Ingredients: (should be cool)

1 cup organic raw honey
2/3 cup extra virgin coconut oil (firm, almost cold)

:study: Preparation:

In a chilled, medium bowl, and with an electric whisk, blend the coconut oil and honey until smooth.
Keep cool until served; ingredients may separate if warm.

A small amount of cinnamon, natural cocoa, or complementary spices may be added while blending.
Or try 1 tsp organic lemon or orange oil; finely shredded coconut adds flavorful texture!

Rod :D

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Angel Hair Pasta

Post by Amigoo » Sun Aug 30, 2015 3:55 pm

Angel Hair Pasta

Not an award-winning recipe but nourishing comfort food that is satisfying whether served hot or cold, is easy to prepare, and has great potential as a "survival" meal (re: good nourishment, easy preparation, storage of ingredients). Current world conditions hint that the ingredients for many "survival" meals should be stored now (plus extra water)! ;)

:idea: The following recipe easily adapts to preferred herbs, vegetables, and condiments - use fresh ingredients when available for best nutrition (but this recipe as prepared here is quite tasty!).

Ingredients:

- half of 14.5oz box of angel hair pasta*
- 16oz bag frozen petite green peas
- 3 tbsp virgin olive oil
- 1/2 tsp garlic granules
- 1 1/2 tbsp dried chives
- 1 tbsp dried basil
- 1/4 tsp black pepper
- 1/2 tsp salt

:study: Directions:

- Rinse frozen peas and set aside.
- In a large pan, add pasta to a generous amount of boiling water and cook to al dente texture.
- Using a strainer, pour water off pasta and into a medium pan. Return pasta to large pan and set aside.
- Add green peas to water saved from pasta, heat to simmering and parboil peas 5 min.
- While peas are simmering, stir olive oil into pasta, sprinkle on remaining dry ingredients and toss to combine.
- Drain parboiled peas and gently fold into prepared pasta.

* try Barilla Plus Angel Hair Pasta, broken into 1" pieces.

Rod :D

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Southwestern Hummus

Post by Amigoo » Sun Aug 30, 2015 5:54 pm

Re: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EYZTEHW/
(see Southwestern Hummus recipe in Customer Reviews)

:roll: Maybe TMI^2 in this review, but I wanted to bond with this pressure cooker quickly so that I would be inspired to use it often. Today's Southwestern Hummus recipe was unintended - I wanted al dente beans but cooked them too long. Thus, Plan B (and more appealing use of the beans). The hummus (without the Southwestern flavors) was divided into four bowls, with three going to the freezer for use later. ;)

Rod :D

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